13 August 2015
13 August 2015,
 0

Let’s face it, to accept your boss’ friend request is no small decision.

Accept Your Boss’ Friend Request

No matter how contained you might think your Facebook profile is, there is most likely some things you would rather keep apart from your work-life, but there can be quite a few advantages to accepting your boss’ friend request…

Social media sites are increasingly popular and becoming more useful in various aspects of day-to-day lives, but before you accept that request from your boss, there are a few things you should take into consideration – it all depends on the kind of boss you have!

Scenario 1:

You have a really cool boss who lets you listen to the music you love while you work and even buys cake for every employee’s birthday; you have a professional relationship, but you’re not scared to make a joke in front of your them – to accept your boss’ friend request is a no brainer. It’ll show your them that you are comfortable with sharing information on a social platform and it might just be funny to see what your employer gets up to over the weekend.

Scenario 2:

You work at a really corporate company and you hardly come into contact with your boss, but you don’t feel intimidated or unable to speak your mind if you do happen to cross paths. You might want to crank up those privacy settings if you accept your boss’ friend request, but you don’t think your professional relationship will be harmed by sharing your profile. After all, you both have personal lives and like to have fun outside of the office.

Scenario 3:

Your boss is form an entirely different generation and you feel like they just want to keep tabs on you, or the friend request is an attempt to be accepted by the younger employees in an effort to seem more ‘with it’ than what you might think. You’re not entirely comfortable with sharing personal details and after-hour activities with your boss, but you have to consider the benefits of accepting the friend request as well. Here’s a few to ponder about:

Accept Your Boss’ Friend Request1. It’s Nothing Personal:

If your company has a Facebook page and you’re invited, it is simply a way of welcoming you to the team. Most companies use their Facebook accounts as a means of advertising and keeping all the employees in the loop about upcoming meetings or activities. It is also a great way for companies to include everybody in discussions or decisions regarding matters in the workplace and a stress-free environment for employees to voice their opinions. You might actually be able to contribute valuable insight to your company by accepting that friend request.

2. Recruitment Fees:

This is certainly an incentive to accept your boss’ friend request on Facebook; there are certain companies out there that use Facebook as a tool to help with employee recruitment. Salesforce, for instance, uses specialised software to scan credentials and information of the employee’s friends for potential candidates when positions in the company become available. You could suggest that they look at some of your friends who might qualify for the positions and if they end up employing your friend, most companies will offer you a very welcome recruitment fee.

3. Sizing Up The Boss:

You might have a very tight and professional relationship with your boss, but apart from just working together, you have to spend most of your waking hours in close proximity and you want to feel comfortable to ask certain questions or request leave sometimes. The easiest way of getting to know someone better is by taking a look at their social media profiles; by accepting your boss’ friend request, you have a sure way of looking into their personal preferences, family life and his social life all at once. By getting a better feel for the type of person your boss is out of the office, you might end up feeling more comfortable around them inside of the office; this alone could reduce stress and improve productivity.

4. Backing Your Story:

I don’t know about you, but I hate asking for family responsibility leave, or any leave for that matter, no matter how entitled I am to take it. I take pride in my work and in being on time, but life is unpredictable and sometimes, you can’t help not being able to go to work. If you are Facebook friends with your boss and you posted at midnight that you are awake and tending to your sick child, you won’t feel like you need to give an excuse if you phone in the morning and request family responsibility leave, because your boss will most likely see your post and your leave would be substantiated. Same goes for sick leave; you can post a picture of you being in bed with noodle soup and your boss will see all your friends’ “get well soon” messages on you wall.

5. Save Yourself:

One of the biggest reasons why you should go ahead and accept your boss’ Facebook friend request is to save the embarrassment of being asked why you declined in the first place… You can always set the privacy settings really high to avoid your boss seeing anything incriminating about you and your social life, but you can’t just avoid the request and hope it’ll go away – you just have to always remember that you’ve accepted that your boss’ request before complaining about your workload or posting inappropriate status updates, ok?

Accept your boss' friend request6. Because it’s Your Job:

If you work at a company that depends on Social Media platforms like I do, accepting your boss’s Facebook request means promoting your company. Be Visible is a company that does Web Design and manages Search Engine Optimisation, as well as Social Media Management for thousands of companies. By accepting my boss’ friend request and liking our company’s page, I support the company and I can share promotional content for the company on my Facebook page. We have branches here in Cape Town, Pretoria, Johannesburg and Nelspruit, so if you ever need a website that reaps results, get in touch with someone a Be Visible branch near you.

Source: http://www.jelliweb.co.za/

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